Courses Taught by FNIS Faculty

Along with instructing courses within First Nations and Indigenous Studies, our faculty members teach courses in their respective disciplinary backgrounds. FNIS instructors will be teaching the following courses during 2016W:

  • POLI 316A – Global Indigenous Politics
  • ENGL 227 – Prose Fiction
  • ENGL 476K – Decolonial Love and Resurgence in Indigenous Activist Literature
  • GEOG 446B – Topics in Geography

POLI 316A 001 (3) Global Indigenous Politics

The political dynamics of Indigenous peoples? politics on the global level; the legal and practical realities of colonization as a global Indigenous experience; current global Indigenous political issues and avenues of Indigenous resistance.

Instructor: Sheryl Lightfoot
Term: 1
Pre-requisites: none

ENGL 227 002 (3) Prose Fiction

Principles, methods and resources for reading the novel and the short story.

Instructor: Daniel Justice
Term 2
Pre-requisuites: ((Pre-requisites must be met by the first day of classes or students will be withdrawn). One of (a) 6 credits of 100-level English; or, (b) WRDS 150 or ASTU 150 and 3 credits of 100-level English, or (c) 6 credits of ASTU 100 OR 3 credits of ASTU 100 and 3 credits of 100-level English; or, (d) ARTS 001.)

ENGL 476K 002 (3) Decolonial Love and Resurgence in Indigenous Activist Literature

This course will critically engage the works of contemporary Indigenous authors from both Canada and the United States with a comparative perspective situated in the broad field of Indigenous studies.  We will read a variety of poetry, short fiction, non-fiction, and novels as well as criticism in Indigenous studies.  The organizing questions for this particular semester are: What is the relationship between activism and contemporary Indigenous literature?  How have Indigenous writers used popular literary forms to intervene in American or Canadian discourses about Native peoples?  How do Indigenous scholars and writers contextualize contemporary narratives culturally, politically and historically? How do they address sovereignty, self-determination, decolonization and resurgence in their work? What makes a work “activist” literature?  We will address themes taken up in Indigenous literature such as carcerality, gender and sexual violence, decolonial love, and resistance. Texts may include the following:

Instructor: Dory Nason
Term 2
Pre-requisites: ((Pre-requisites must be met by the first day of class or students will be withdrawn). Third year standing and, one of (a) 6 credits of 100-level English; or, (b) WRDS 150 or ASTU 150 plus 3 credits of 100-level English; or, (c) 6 credits of ASTU 100 or 3 credits of ASTU 100 and 3 credits of 100-level English; or, (d) ARTS 001.)

GEOG 446B 201 (3) Topics in Geography

This seminar examines issues of law, geography and power, including discussion of Indigenous law, spatio-legal dynamics of empire, regulation of mobility, geographies of legal violence, and formations of property, jurisdiction, and territory.

Instructor: Sarah Hunt
Term 2
Pre-requisites: none