FNIS Courses

These FNIS courses are being offered in the 2020 Winter session:

 

FNIS 100 001 (3) Indigenous Foundations
FNIS 100 will introduce the social, historical, political, religious, and philosophical contexts that inform the experiences of many Indigenous peoples and communities in Canada and throughout North America, with attention to global Indigenous concerns. Emphasis will be on the ways Indigenous peoples have engaged with and challenged colonialism through cultural resurgence and revitalization, education, artistic production, self-government, and culturally responsive economic development, and will include guest speakers, films, and community engagement activities. If you have any questions, feel free to email Dr. David Gaertner at david.gaertner@ubc.ca.

Prerequisite: none
Instructor: Gaertner, David
Term 1

 

FNIS 210 001 (3) Indigenous Politics and Self-Determination
The cultural, historical, political, economic, and gender dynamics that structure the relationship between Indigenous peoples and the state in Canada; Indigenous self-determination struggles in relation to constitutional recognition, self-government, land claims, and economic development. If you have any questions, feel free to email Dr. Glen Coulthard at glen.coulthard@ubc.ca.

Prerequisite: none (FNIS 100 is recommended)
Instructor: Coulthard, Glen
Term 2

 

FNIS 220 001 (3) Representation and Indigenous Cultural Politics
Representation, identity, and cultural politics through Indigenous literature, film, and the visual arts; the relationship between these sites of cultural production and the self-determination struggles of Indigenous peoples. If you have any questions, feel free to email Dr. Candis Callison at candis.callison@ubc.ca

Prerequisite: none (FNIS 100 is recommended)
Instructor: Callison, Candis
Term 1

 

FNIS 310 001 (3) Critical Indigenous Theory Seminar
The purpose of this course is to introduce some of the more common theoretical concepts, approaches and related issues in the field of Indigenous Studies in order to help prepare students for further advanced study in the FNIS core curriculum. Beginning with the critical discourse around identity and related subjects of whiteness, race, sexuality and gender in Canada and the US, the course will turn to cultural analysis of settler national identities and myth-making, the making of history/narrative, theorizing settler colonialism, and end with critical discourses of Indigenous feminisms, Indigenous resurgence, and Indigenous research methodologies.

Prerequisite: FNSP 200, or FNSP 210 and 220, or FNIS 210 and 220
Instructor: Nason, Dory
Term 1

 

FNIS 320 001 (3) Critical Indigenous Methodologies and Ethics
This course is designed to provide FNIS majors and minors with training and experience in designing and conducting research on issues of concern to Indigenous people and communities. The course focuses on the theory and practice of community-based research from a critical Indigenous perspective, including methods for collecting and analyzing research materials, oral history/qualitative interviewing and analysis, and research ethics.

~Prerequisite: FNSP 310 or FNIS 310
Instructor: Nason, Dory
Term 2

 

FNIS 400 002 (6) Practicum/Advanced Research Seminar
The purpose of the research practicum is to give students the opportunity to work on research projects in community settings that address community needs. Community organizations identify areas of need and students will work with an organization to develop projects that address these needs. In conjunction with the work students do for their organization, they will develop a second academic research project, described below, for FNIS, and will also make a public presentation of their work on campus. FNIS 400 will be held entirely synchronously.

Prerequisite: FNSP 310 and 320, or FNIS 310 and 320 (Students must pass FNSP 320 or FNIS 320 with a B- or higher or request Program approval)
Instructor: Justice, Daniel
Term 1 – 2

 

FNIS 401C 101: Indigenous Oral History Interviewing: Theory, Method, and Practice

Due to cultural differences and western constructions of history, much of the history of Indigenous communities, organizations, and individuals, especially as understood by them, is not widely known. Oral history is one way of adding to public or community records when there is the desire to do so. This course will consider the theory, methods, and practice for interviewing, organizing, and activating records and the ethics and complexities involved in creating them. Under current circumstances, the uses of internet technology as an alternative method for interviewing will also be a focus.

Prerequisite: One of FNIS 100, FNSP 200, FNIS 210, FNSP 210, FNIS 220, FNSP 220 or instructor permission.
Instructor: Kesler, Linc
Term 1

FNIS 452 101 (3) Indigenous Social Movements

Draws on Indigenous and non-Indigenous intellectual traditions to explore the theoretical, cultural, political, economic, and historical bases of Indigenous peoples decolonization struggles in Canada. Credit will be granted for only one of FNSP 401A, FNIS 452, or FNSP 452.

Prerequisite: One of FNIS 100, FNSP 200, FNIS 210, FNSP 210, FNIS 220, FNSP 220 or instructor permission.
Instructor: Coulthard, Glen
Term 2

FNIS 454 101 (3) Indigenous New Media

New media and digital storytelling works designed and implemented by Indigenous artists, authors, and programmers. This course is not eligible for Credit/D/Fail grading.
Prerequisite: One of FNIS 100, FNSP 200, FNIS 210, FNSP 210, FNIS 220, FNSP 220.
Instructor: Gaertner, David
Term 2

FNIS 401E 101 (3) Decolonizing Documentaries
Students will be introduced to the theirstory of Indigenous documentary theory and practice. An overview of the development of Indigenous documentary and its potential as an integral part of creative Indigenous protocols and practices will be explored through lectures, and the production of a short documentary. This course focuses on documentary as a form of resistance, strength and empowerment. Graduate students can email cis.program@ubc.ca if interested in joining the graduate section of the course.

~Prerequisite: One of FNIS 100, FNSP 200, FNIS 210, FNSP 210, FNIS 220, FNSP 220 or instructor permission.
Instructor: Koostachin, Jules

FNIS 100 001 (3) Indigenous Foundations
FNIS 100 will introduce the social, historical, political, religious, and philosophical contexts that inform the experiences of many Indigenous peoples and communities in Canada and throughout North America, with attention to global Indigenous concerns. Emphasis will be on the ways Indigenous peoples have engaged with and challenged colonialism through cultural resurgence and revitalization, education, artistic production, self-government, and culturally responsive economic development, and will include guest speakers, films, and community engagement activities.

~Prerequisite: none
Instructor: Koostachin, Jules
Term 2 *condensed*