Sessionals, Post-Doctoral Fellows, Visiting Scholars, and Artists

One of the firm ongoing commitments of FNIS is to continue to support and highlight the work of today’s most compelling Indigenous Studies scholars and Indigenous artists.  To that end, we are developing an endowment to help make such visits possible each term, with opportunities for our community to engage with these distinguished guests ranging from two weeks to a full academic year.  If you are interested in supporting this important work, please email the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies (CIS) Acting Director, Dory Nason, for more information.

We also hope to attract and support the research leaders of tomorrow by hosting Postdoctoral Fellows and, when possible, making sessional teaching opportunities available for emerging and established scholars who are dedicated to teaching excellence in the field of Critical Indigenous Studies. For more information, contact the Program at cis.arts@ubc.ca.

 

Corey Snelgrove is a white settler PhD Candidate in the Department of Political Science at the University of British Columbia. His dissertation examines the context for and concepts of reconciliation and treaty in Canadian political and social life through the emancipatory theoretical traditions of Indigenous political thought, Critical Theory, and Marxism. 

Jules is a band member of Attawapiskat First Nation, the ancestral lands of the MoshKeKo InNiNeWak. She currently resides in Vancouver where she is a PhD candidate with the Institute of Gender, Race, Sexuality, and Social Justice at the University of British Columbia, her research focus is Indigenous documentary

Emma Feltes is a white settler PhD Candidate in the Department of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia. Her research on the “Constitution Express”—a ground-breaking 1980s movement that fought for Indigenous nationhood during the patriation of Canada’s Constitution—seeks direction on how to re-shape political and legal relations between Indigenous peoples and the settler state today.