People

Maggie is an Academic Advisor with Aboriginal Student Affairs in the Faculty of Arts. She holds an MA in History from UBC, and previously attended Simon Fraser, Concordia and Capilano Universities. Her first co-op job was conducting research for In-SHUCK-ch/N’quatqua Treaty Group and she has worked with Indigenous artists and communities on exhibits at the UBC Museum of Anthropology and other Lower Mainland museums. She joined Arts Advising in 2016 and is available to help with questions about academic planning and graduation.

Coll Thrush (PhD, Washington, 2002) is a historian of place, looking at the intersections between Indigenous histories and the histories of settler colonialism. His first book, Native Seattle: Histories from the Crossing-Over Place (2007, second edition released in 2017), examined the links between urban and Indigenous histories in the Northwest’s largest city, while his most recent book, Indigenous London: Native Travellers at the Heart of Empire (2016), reframes the history of the British Empire’s capital through the experiences of Indigenous children, women, and men who journeyed there, willingly or otherwise. He has also written about ghosts, earthquakes and tsunamis, and food. His current projects are an archivally-grounded fictional work set during the Green River Killer case in the 1980s, entitled SlaughterTown, and a critical cultural and environmental history of shipwrecks and settler colonialism on the Northwest Coast, entitled Wrecked: Ecologies of Failure in the Graveyard of the Pacific. Most of his courses are FNIS-approved, and he also offers a field course in London through FNIS every third year. For more information about Coll, please visit the UBC History website.

Margot Leigh Butler has been the Academic Director of Hum (Humanities 101 Community Programme at UBC and in the Downtown Eastside/Downtown South (DTES/S) since 2006. Now in its 20th year and with almost a thousand alumni, the Programme runs four free, university-level, Cultural Studies-style courses on campus — and free public programmes at local community centres — with low income residents of the DTES/S and nearby areas. Dr. Butler has long worked closely with CIS staff and faculty, many of whom are guest teachers on Hum’s Indigenous-strong courses. Her work as a teacher, theorist, activist and installation artist focuses on practices and figurations of implicatedness.

Sarah is the Senior Program Assistant (Students) for the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies. She is a recent FNIS graduate and was raised on Anishinaabe territory in Thunder Bay.

Sarah Maddison is Associate Professor of Politics in the School of Social and Political Sciences, and co-Director of the Indigenous Settler Relations Collaboration. Sarah is particularly interested in work that helps reconceptualise political relationships between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and the Australian settler state, including critical examinations of a range of relevant public policies.

Connie Wintels is the Administrator of the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies (CIS) and is responsible for the daily operation of the Institute.

 

Emma Feltes is a white settler PhD Candidate in the Department of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia. Her research on the “Constitution Express”—a ground-breaking 1980s movement that fought for Indigenous nationhood during the patriation of Canada’s Constitution—seeks direction on how to re-shape political and legal relations between Indigenous peoples and the settler state today.

Sally is from the UK and has moved to Canada three separate times! This is her thirteenth department at UBC and she is excited to get to know the students and faculty of CIS.

Dale Gintner is the Interim Program Assistant and supports the daily administration of the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies. Originally from Brazil, she arrived in Canada in 2017 for a post-degree diploma in International Business Management. She has many years of work experience in Education, Administration and Event Planning.

Beverly is a 2nd generation Cantonese settler and a 4th year student in FNIS and Geography (environment and sustainability). She will be working as the CIS Winter Project Assistant for the Institute of Critical Indigenous Studies. Beverly is happy to answer any questions about her time at UBC.