People

Candace Kaleimamoowahinekapu Galla (Kanaka Maoli) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Language and Literacy Education (Faculty of Education) and in the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies (Faculty of Arts) at the University of British Columbia. She has taught a variety of courses that focus on Indigenous language revitalization that have included materials development, performative arts, and an international collaboration with eight post-secondary institutions.

Coll Thrush (PhD, Washington, 2002) is a historian of place, looking at the intersections between Indigenous histories and the histories of settler colonialism. His first book, Native Seattle: Histories from the Crossing-Over Place (2007, second edition released in 2017), examined the links between urban and Indigenous histories in the Northwest’s largest city, while his most recent book, Indigenous London: Native Travellers at the Heart of Empire (2016), reframes the history of the British Empire’s capital through the experiences of Indigenous children, women, and men who journeyed there, willingly or otherwise. He has also written about ghosts, earthquakes and tsunamis, and food. His current projects are an archivally-grounded fictional work set during the Green River Killer case in the 1980s, entitled SlaughterTown, and a critical cultural and environmental history of shipwrecks and settler colonialism on the Northwest Coast, entitled Wrecked: Ecologies of Failure in the Graveyard of the Pacific. Most of his courses are FNIS-approved, and he also offers a field course in London through FNIS every third year. For more information about Coll, please visit the UBC History website.

Sally is the CIS Program Assistant and covers all things finance and student payroll. She is from the UK and has moved to Canada three separate times! This is her thirteenth department at UBC and she is excited to get to know the students and faculty of CIS.

Tanya Bob assists with the First Nations and Indigenous Studies Practicum, and is also the CIS Associate Director.

Glen Coulthard is Yellowknives Dene and an associate professor in the First Nations and Indigenous Studies Program and the Departments of Political Science at the University of British Columbia.

David Gaertner is a settler scholar of German descent. He specializes in new media and critical technology studies. He is an Associate Editor of BC Studies and a Green College Leading Scholar. His most recent book, The Theatre of Regret: Troubling Reconciliation in Canada, is forthcoming from UBC Press in 2020.

Sarah Hunt is Kwagiulth (Kwakwaka’wakw) from Tsaxis, and has spent most of her life as a guest in Lkwungen territories.  Her scholarship in Indigenous and legal geographies critically takes up questions of violence, justice, self-determination and resurgence.

Daniel Heath Justice is a Colorado-born citizen of the Cherokee Nation/ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ. He holds the Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Literature and Expressive Culture at UBC, and is a specialist in Indigenous literary studies. His most recent book is Why Indigenous Literatures Matter (2018). Daniel’s scholarly and creative work focuses on questions of other-than-human kinship, Indigenous belonging, and imaginative sovereignty.

Linc Kesler (PhD – University of Toronto) has been with First Nations and Indigenous Studies since 2003 when he came to UBC as the first Chair of the program. He designed and taught the initial versions FNIS 310, 320 and 400, and is returning after several years in central administration and time away.

Sheryl Lightfoot is Anishinaabe, a citizen of the Lake Superior Band of Ojibwe, enrolled at the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community in Baraga, Michigan. She is Canada Research Chair in Global Indigenous Rights & Politics. Recently she was appointed the Senior Advisor to the President on Indigenous Affairs in the First Nations House of Learning. Specializing in Indigenous politics, especially on the global level, Sheryl holds a joint position with the Department of Political Science.